WP5: Innovations in Data Access


D5.1 Guidelines for ethics considerations in making biomedical survey data FAIR (Access to biomedical data)

This report is Deliverable 5.1 of the Social Sciences and Humanities Open Cloud (SSHOC) project, and a result of Task 1 focusing on the legal, ethical, and technological issues of access to biomedical data. The aim of the task is to make biomedical data available to the research community via data access that follows the FAIR principles.

D5.17 Implementation plan for the archeological case study

In SSHOC Task 5.7 (Open Linked Data. Archaeology Case Study), a virtual reconstruction of the Roman theatre in Catania will be created as an example of an actual transition of archaeological data to the cloud, i.e. from data silos on individual computers to webservices. The case study is based on a unified workflow that starts with the archaeological documentation and results in a virtual reconstruction.

D5.20 Training materials of workshop for secure data facility professionals

Social science and humanities research infrastructures allow the sharing and safe use of confidential data for research. In recent years there has been a shift towards virtual data enclaves or Remote Access or Remote Desktop systems that offer fewer physical controls. They need to be replaced with other safeguards, including often mandatory training. This training aims to ensure that researchers are equipped with the knowledge required to use secure/legally controlled data safely.

D5.2 Data access protocol for DBSS data, linked to survey data, conforming FAIR principles (Access to biomedical data)

The deliverable documents a data access plan for enhancing the availability of biomarker data from dried blood spot samples collected by SHARE. The procedure will be of interest to researchers, survey methodologists, and data archives providing biomedical data collected in survey settings.

D5.3 Data access protocol for accelerometer data, linked to survey data, conforming FAIR principles (Access to biomedical data)

This deliverable is a result of Task 5.1 of the Social Sciences and Humanities Open Cloud (SSHOC) project, focusing on the legal, ethical, and technological issues of access to biomedical data. The task deals with the challenge of adapting the FAIR principles to the access of biomedical data available for the research community. As an intermediate step to the actual data access, this deliverable provides the data access plan for making accelerometer data available.

D5.7 Report on the impact of the GDPR and its implications for EOSC

Background: The General Data Protection Regulation (EU) 2016/679 (hereinafter referred to as GDPR or the Regulation) 1 has given European countries a unique opportunity to harmonize their legal framework, and to improve the conditions for research and cross-border data flow. Although one of the rationales behind the GDPR was to harmonize the legal framework for data processing to improve conditions for research and cross-border data flow. This represents both risks and opportunities.

D5.8 Draft SSH GDPR Code of Conduct

The General Data Protection Regulation (EU) 2016/679 (hereinafter GDPR or this Regulation) has given European countries a unique opportunity to harmonise their legal framework, and to improve the conditions for research and cross-border data flow. Although one of the rationales behind the GDPR was to harmonise the legal framework for data processing to improve conditions for research and crossborder data flow, this has not necessarily been the case.

D5.9 Framework and contract for international data use agreements on remote access to confidential data

The purpose of this report is to provide a template for a contract for international access to confidential microdata.

MS21 Protocol of laboratory processing of DBSS data

In cross-national population studies measuring health and life style factors in ageing by self-reported information is challenging due to several difficulties, such as socio-cultural differences in reporting style, social desirability and access to health care etc. Moreover, in older people a new health condition may remain unrecognised by sharing the same symptoms as an existing disease, or by having symptoms that are interpreted as a result of ageing per se. Also, cognitive decline or depressive symptoms may affect correct recollection.

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